Bookish gems from the inaugural Seattle Art Fair

Phil Shaw London New York..., 2014

The first ever Seattle Art Fair is in the books and by most accounts it’s another feather in the cap for the Emerald City. The tech boom with its inherent money showers combined with our proximity to Asia make for an enticing mix and when Paul Allen throws his hat in the ring usually something good happens. I have been saying this for a while now; there are few cities in America as well positioned as Seattle to become one of the leading cities of the 21st century. 

The show consisted of a healthy mix of local galleries with some of the big boys from New York, Los Angeles and beyond and it was great to see numerous text and bookworks sprinkled throughout the fair. 

Here is a sampling of our favorites from our visit. Many of the artists deserve and will get a more comprehensive look at their bookwork in the near future.

What fun.

Hamilton_bookweightAnn Hamilton. book weight aa (human carriage) , 2009-2010. Archival inkjet print, 63 × 46 3/4 in. Edition of 10 + 2AP. Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland

Top image: Phil Shaw. London New York Paris Moscow, 2014, eight color pigment based archival print on Hahnemuhle paper, 46 7/8 x 37 3/4 in, edition of 60. Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery, London. Each shelf represents a subway line in the corresponding city.

Seattle Art Fair In the news:

Seattle Art Fair Receives a Boost From Tech’s Big Spenders | New York Times

via art net

7 Reasons Why the Seattle Art Fair Is Important for the Art World | Eileen Kinsella 

Seattle Art Fair Attracts Local Tech Royalty but Future Remains Uncertain | Sheila Farr

Susanna Hesselberg’s Underground Library

Susanna Hesselberg underground library

Every two years on the coast of Denmark the Sculpture by the Sea exhibition takes place. It is the nations largest outdoor exhibition and for this years incarnation 56 site-specific sculptures graced the Danish coast.

Among them was Susanna Hesselberg’s homage to her father and books:  “When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library Had Burned Down” (a reference to Laurie Anderson’s song World Without End).

Reminiscent of the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland the library descends deep underground. With the top sealed and only the page ends visible the library is completely inaccessible. The work powerfully portrays the depth of her grief and becomes a search for meaning within the context of a great loss.

Susanna-Hesselberg-catalogodiseno-4

 

Susanna Hesselberg underground library b

Photos by Claire Voon for Hyperallergic

h/t Colossal