Bookish gems from the inaugural Seattle Art Fair

Phil Shaw London New York..., 2014

The first ever Seattle Art Fair is in the books and by most accounts it’s another feather in the cap for the Emerald City. The tech boom with its inherent money showers combined with our proximity to Asia make for an enticing mix and when Paul Allen throws his hat in the ring usually something good happens. I have been saying this for a while now; there are few cities in America as well positioned as Seattle to become one of the leading cities of the 21st century. 

The show consisted of a healthy mix of local galleries with some of the big boys from New York, Los Angeles and beyond and it was great to see numerous text and bookworks sprinkled throughout the fair. 

Here is a sampling of our favorites from our visit. Many of the artists deserve and will get a more comprehensive look at their bookwork in the near future.

What fun.

Hamilton_bookweightAnn Hamilton. book weight aa (human carriage) , 2009-2010. Archival inkjet print, 63 × 46 3/4 in. Edition of 10 + 2AP. Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland

Top image: Phil Shaw. London New York Paris Moscow, 2014, eight color pigment based archival print on Hahnemuhle paper, 46 7/8 x 37 3/4 in, edition of 60. Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery, London. Each shelf represents a subway line in the corresponding city.

Seattle Art Fair In the news:

Seattle Art Fair Receives a Boost From Tech’s Big Spenders | New York Times

via art net

7 Reasons Why the Seattle Art Fair Is Important for the Art World | Eileen Kinsella 

Seattle Art Fair Attracts Local Tech Royalty but Future Remains Uncertain | Sheila Farr

The Public Collection: A new public art and literacy project

Public Collection

This August eight unique artist created libraries will grace the streets of Indianapolis. Under the moniker of The Public Collection these amazing micro libraries will be spread over the city and offer free books courtesy of the Indianapolis Public Library.

The Public Collection is a blend of art and literacy.  The goal is to “increase access to books through the use of functional pieces of art in familiar settings. The initiatives are to improve literacy, foster a deeper appreciation of the arts, and raise awareness for educational justice in the community.”

Tom Torluemke, model for “Cool Books, Food for Thought” (2015)

The Public Collection was developed by artist Rachel M. Simon, with support from the Herbert Simon Family Foundation. As Simon tells Hyperallergic “Libraries are sacred institutions, and the value of physical books is timeless…The need and desire for physical books and libraries will always exist” and with The Public Collection Simon offers us a powerful one-two punch with a slate of appealing venues and greater access to books.

Katie Hudnall, model for “Untitled” (2015)

Kimberly McNeelan, model for “Evolution of Reading” (2015)

Brose-Partington_City-Market_ThePublicCollection-e1437081108728Brose Partington, model for “Untitled” (2015)

Borrowing Books from Sculptural Micro-Libraries | Hyperallergic

The Public Collection website