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Bookseller, Bookseller, why do you weep? July 3, 2012

The Bookseller Bookseller, Bookseller, why do you weep?Because I must sell my books far too cheap. Bookseller, Bookseller, why do you grin?Because an old lady is just coming in. Bookseller, Bookseller, why all this joy?Because she requires a nice book for a boy. Bookseller, Bookseller, why do you cough?Ahem! Well, the discount forgot to come off. Bookseller, Bookseller, why are you gay?Beause it’s my best of business to-day. Bookseller, Bookseller, why are you mad?Because the…

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We’re Off to Illustrate the Wizard; The Wonderful Wizard of Oz May 16, 2011

    Zoe Andreas  Blank Pages, an arm of the London based design agency Fridge Creative, would like you to help illustrate  L. Frank Baum’s classic ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’,  How it Works: The entire text of the book has been uploaded with blank pages interspersed throughout. When you happen upon a  blank white page it is need of an illustration. Draw it up and send it off, if the editors like it you’re in.…

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Famous Authors Drawn, Not Quartered January 25, 2010

Martin Droeshout’s 1623 Engraving Of William Shakespeare. The purpose of any portrait is to capture the essence of the subject. To somehow convey in a single image not just the outward appearance of the sitter, but his soul. But if the subject is a great writer, does that task become impossible? Poet Ben Jonson thought so, and maybe the curators at Princeton University’s Firestone Library do, too. Those curators have just opened a new exhibit…

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Rare Maurice Sendak "Where The Wild Things Are" Original Art Surfaces October 9, 2009

A standard, letter-size envelope featuring Where The Wild Things Are original art by its sender, Maurice Sendak, has recently surfaced. The envelope (3 1/2 x 6 1/2 in; 90 x 165 mm), postmarked New York Jan 27, 1966, is autograph addressed by Sendak to fellow Caldecott Medal award winner, Nonny Hogrogian, with Sendak’s autograph name and return address to the flap. Considering its journey through the United States Postal Service and forty-three year life, it…

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